Digital Media in Teaching and its Added Value

Digital Media in Teaching and its Added Value

von: David F. Conway, Stefanie Hillen, Melodee Landis, Mary T. Schlegelmilch, Peter Wolcott

Waxmann Verlag GmbH, 2015

ISBN: 9783830982876 , 236 Seiten

Format: PDF, OL

Kopierschutz: DRM

Windows PC,Mac OSX Apple iPad, Android Tablet PC's Online-Lesen für: Windows PC,Mac OSX,Linux

Preis: 30,99 EUR

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Digital Media in Teaching and its Added Value


 

Buchtitel

1

Contents

5

Preface

7

The Value of Investigating Information Technology Applications for Teaching and Learning Purposes (David F. Conway, Melodee Landis, Stefanie A. Hillen, Mary T. Schlegelmilch and Peter Wolcott)

11

1. Overview on the Value of Investigating Information Technology Applications for Teaching and Learning Purposes

11

1.1 IT-Pedagogy in Education

11

1.2 Theoretical Frameworks

12

2. The Volume’s Discussions in Detail

13

2.1 Instruction in Higher Education

14

2.2 Education and Training

15

2.3 Globalization and Social Media

15

3. Challenges Made Visible, Preliminary Overarching Findings and Outlook

16

References

17

Adding Value with Constructivism – Using a Constructivist Model to Expand Teachers’ Uses of Digital Technology (Melodee Landis)

21

Abstract

21

1. Using a Constructivist Model to Expand Teachers’ Uses of Digital Technology

21

2. Procedure

22

3. The Model

23

4. The Study

24

5. Results

25

6. Conclusion

31

References

32

Towards a Contingency Theory of eLearning (Deepak Khazanchi, Bjørn Erik Munkvold and Aleksandra Lazareva)

35

Abstract

35

1. Background and Purpose

35

2. Theory Development

36

3. Discussion and an Illustration

42

4. Implications and Concluding Remarks

47

References

48

Collaborative Technologies and Digital Media in Teaching and Learning: Starting Small and Learning Along the Way (Jeanne L. Surface, Mary T. Schlegelmilch and Phyllis Adcock)

52

Abstract

52

1. Introduction – Starting Small

52

2. Purpose

53

3. Research Design

53

4. Challenges, Discoveries and Experiences Made

55

4.1 Jeanne’s Journey

55

4.2 Phyllis’s Journey

58

4.3 Mary’s Journey

61

5. Conclusions

65

Outlook

66

References

66

IT-Integrated Approaches in Everyday Teaching in Higher Education: Supporting Interaction and Communication in High Enrollment Classes (Stefanie A. Hillen)

67

Abstract

67

Introduction

67

1. Learning with IT-Tools: Theoretical Platform and Research Objective

68

2. Applied Tools and their Organizational and Educational Functions for Teaching and Learning

69

2.1 Baseline for Feedback and Formative Assessment

69

2.2 Tools Applied to Lectures, Seminars and Accompanying Learning Activities

70

3. Analysis on the ICT Integrated Course and Students Results

76

3.1 Descriptive Quantitative Results – Distribution and Correlation

76

3.2 Students’ Perceptions and Students’ Data

78

4. On the Educational Added Value of the IT Application and Requirements for Its Use

80

References

81

Information Technology for Development: Service Learning from Classroom to Community and Back Again (Peter Wolcott and R. J. Redden)

85

Abstract

85

1. Introduction

85

1.1 From Classroom

86

1.2 To Community

87

2. Methods and Techniques Applied

88

2.1 Agile Training

88

2.2 Pair Training

91

2.3 Parallel Tracks

91

2.4 Refocus on the User

92

2.5 The OODA Loop

92

2.6 Demonstrationless Training

93

3. Agile Training Process

94

4. Measuring Impact

94

5. And Back Again

96

6. Summary and Conclusions

97

References

98

Educating Programming Students for the Industry (Morten Goodwin, Christian Auby, Rune Andersen and Vera Barstad)

100

Abstract

100

1. Introduction

100

2. Motivation

101

2.1 Business Environments

101

2.2 Immediate Feedback

102

2.3 Peer Review

103

3. Design of Study

103

3.1 Prototype

104

3.2 Version Control

106

3.3 Build and Test Environment

106

3.4 Build Plan

107

3.5 Student Activities

108

3.6 Peer Review

109

4. Test Case – Basic Programming

110

4.1 Usage – Commits

110

4.2 Assignment and Feedback

111

5. Discussion

113

5.1 Typical Student Mistakes

113

5.2 Cursing over Version Control

114

5.3 Unforeseen Advantages

114

5.4 Possibilities of Cheating

114

5.5 Tests which are not Passed in the Automatic Testing

115

5.6 Learning Outcome

115

6. Conclusion

115

Acknowledgement

116

References

116

The World Needs More Computer Science! What to do? (Victor Winter)

119

1. Introduction: Computer Science Education

119

2. The Bricklayer System

121

2.1 Target Audience

121

2.2 System Components

123

2.3 System Requirements

124

3. Method: The “Vitruvia Way”

125

3.1 Vitruvia Basics – Before Coding

125

3.2 Vitruvia Level 1 Coding

129

3.3 Vitruvia Level 2 Coding

131

3.4 Vitruvia Level 3 Coding

132

3.5 Vitruvia Level 4 Coding

134

3.6 Vitruvia Level 5 Coding

134

4. Future Work – Level 6 and Beyond

136

5. Summary and Conclusion

140

References

140

Building an Online Systems Development Course – Experiences with Content and Interaction Design (Paul J. A. van Vliet)

142

Abstract

142

1. Introduction

142

2. The Systems Development Courses: An Overview

142

3. A Pedagogical Basis for Course Redevelopment

144

4. Course Redevelopment Initiation

144

5. Online Course Content Development

145

6. Online Course Content Delivery

147

7. Software Development Tools for Online Students

147

8. Online Collaboration Tools and Usage

148

9. Lessons Learned from the Course Redevelopment Effort

150

9.1 Today’s Students and Their Expectations

150

9.2 Establishing a Course Rhythm

151

9.3 The Value of Preparation

151

9.4 The Value of Media Flexibility

152

9.5 The Value of Collaboration Platform Flexibility

153

9.6 Establishing Collaboration Protocols

153

9.7 The Instructor’s Role(s)

154

9.8 Course Redevelopment Effort Summary

155

10. Conclusion

156

References

157

How to Teach Habits? (Rune Andersen, Andreas Prinz and Halvard Øysæd)

159

Abstract

159

1. Introduction

159

2. Background: Changes in Project Management

160

2.1 Changes in National Engineering Curriculum

160

2.2 The Industry

161

2.3 Learning Outcomes for Project Management

161

3. Theory: Habits related to Bloom’s Taxonomy

162

3.1 Bloom’s taxonomy

162

3.1.1 The Cognitive Domain

162

3.1.2 The Affective Domain

163

3.1.3 The Psychomotor Domain

163

3.2 Learning by Doing

164

3.3 Transfer of Learning

165

4. Experiment

165

4.1 Learning Outcomes for Project Management

165

4.2 Experiment Description

166

4.3 Experiment Results

166

4.4 Conclusions from the Experiment

167

5. Discussion

167

5.1 Habits in Bloom’s Taxonomy

168

5.2 Teaching Habits

169

5.3 The Role of Digital Media in Teaching Habits

170

6. Summary

171

Acknowledgments

171

References

172

Education for Sustainable Development Going Online (Sven Åke Bjørke)

177

Abstract

177

1. Introduction

177

2. Towards Constructivism in Education for Sustainable Development

178

3. ICT-Supported Learning and Education for Sustainable Development

179

4. Holistic Education Promoted by ICT and Education for Sustainable Development

180

5. Online Education in Developing Countries?

181

6. ICT and E-Pedagogy

183

7. Conclusion

188

References

189

Social Media Communication in the Classroom: A Pedagogical Case Study of Social Network Analysis (Jeremy Harris Lipschultz)

191

Abstract

191

Introduction

191

CMC: Identity, Interaction and Community

191

Social Media Communication (SMC) Academic Disruption

192

SNA Network Context and Research Framework

193

Case Study: #Milk4Kids Twitter Hashtag

195

Conclusion

204

References

205

Online Learning Needs Assessment in Uganda (Godfrey Mayende, Paul B. Muyinda, Andreas Prinz, Ghislain Maurice N. Isabwe and Dianah Nampijja)

208

Abstract

208

1. Introduction

208

2. Methodology

210

3. Findings

211

3.1 Social Demographic Characteristics

211

3.2 ICT Infrastructures in the Higher Education Institutions in Uganda

212

3.3 Modes of Delivery of Distance Learning in Higher Education Institutions in Uganda

217

3.4 ICT Integration in the Teaching and Learning

218

3.5 Awareness of Learning Management System (LMS)

219

3.6 Opportunities for Capacity Building

219

3.7 Challenges and suggestions in the use of ICT in teaching and learning

220

4. Discussion

221

5. Summary and Conclusion

222

6. Acknowledgements

223

References

223

About the authors

225

Matrix of digital themes

234